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Matthew Hoy currently works as a metro page designer at the San Diego Union-Tribune.

The opinions presented here do not represent those of the Union-Tribune and are solely those of the author.

If you have any opinions or comments, please e-mail the author at: hoystory -at- cox -dot- net.

Dec. 7, 2001
Christian Coalition Challenged
Hoystory interviews al Qaeda
Fisking Fritz
Politicizing Prescription Drugs

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A note on the Amazon ads: I've chosen to display current events titles in the Amazon box. Unfortunately, Amazon appears to promote a disproportionate number of angry-left books. I have no power over it at this time. Rest assured, I'm still a conservative.



Thursday, December 15, 2005
Partisan vs. Principled: I've made this point repeatedly regarding the New York Times editorial page, but it applies to many other newspaper editorialists -- they are partisan, not principled. For the past couple years this has produced hypocrisy on the issue of judicial filibusters. Both the Times and the Minneapolis Star-Tribune -- among others -- have exposed themselves as partisans over this issue and thereby lowered what meager esteem they may still possess with the public.

Well, today we can add the Boston Globe to the list of editorial pages that have two standards -- one for Republicans and one for Democrats.


OUR NEW YEAR'S wish: a governor who wouldn't rather be elsewhere.

By thumbing his nose at Massachusetts after less than three-quarters of one term as its chief executive, Mitt Romney, yesterday surrendered his clout and squandered his legitimacy. If, as it appears, his heart and mind are no longer in Massachusetts, he should resign.


In the past 20 years, two Democrats have sought the office that Romney appears to be considering -- President of the United States.

Gov. Michael Dukakis ran for president in 1988 against George H.W. Bush and -- wait for it -- the Globe didn't editorialize that he should resign his office.

And just last year, Massachusetts junior senator, John Kerry, demonstrated that he wasn't really happy to be in the Senate, that he'd rather be in the White House. Guess what? The Globe didn't call for Kerry to resign from the Senate, even though he missed hundreds of votes as he campaigned for President.

Let me go out on a limb and suggest that the Globe wouldn't have taken this position were Romney a Democrat.

1:31 PM

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