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Matthew Hoy currently works as a metro page designer at the San Diego Union-Tribune.

The opinions presented here do not represent those of the Union-Tribune and are solely those of the author.

If you have any opinions or comments, please e-mail the author at: hoystory -at- cox -dot- net.

Dec. 7, 2001
Christian Coalition Challenged
Hoystory interviews al Qaeda
Fisking Fritz
Politicizing Prescription Drugs

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Sunday, July 17, 2005
Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince: No spoilers here. I finished reading the book early this afternoon. It's not quite as bulky as "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix," but it's still a substantial read for a book ostensibly targeted at pre-teens.

The book didn't disappoint me at all and certainly leaves one anxious for the exciting conclusion to the story in the next book. As far as planning ahead goes, I'm much more pleased with J.K. Rowling than Robert Jordan, author of "The Wheel of Time" series. Rowling planned for seven books and has stuck to it. Jordan just keeps on dragging the story out as evidenced by his last book, "The Path of Daggers," where nothing actually happens in several hundred pages of fiction.

Anyway, "The Half-Blood Prince," was exciting, well-written and captivating. Don't wait for the paperback.

1:00 PM

Comments:
I don't think Jordan's problem is planning. I think that he has gotten used to getting huge paychecks for his novels and is loathe to give up the money just to finish a story. (The same thing happened to Raymond Feist) Unfortunately, he is losing too many readers. In 1990, when his first book was released, it was a new sub genre for fantasy. Since then there have been the likes of George R. R. Martin (who, unlike Jordan, can actually kill a character or two) and a slew of other writers who can produce similar products.

Rowling doesn't have the same issues when it comes to her books. She probably makes more off the licensing of her characters than she does on the books themselves. And despite only having one book to go, she has four movies to go. Four movies, four releases of toys, four new licensing opportunities. All of this leads to an ability to remain true to the story.
 
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