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Matthew Hoy currently works as a metro page designer at the San Diego Union-Tribune.

The opinions presented here do not represent those of the Union-Tribune and are solely those of the author.

If you have any opinions or comments, please e-mail the author at: hoystory -at- cox -dot- net.

Dec. 7, 2001
Christian Coalition Challenged
Hoystory interviews al Qaeda
Fisking Fritz
Politicizing Prescription Drugs

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Tuesday, February 18, 2003
I'm right -- again: Some opponents of war with Iraq (see below) have suggested that the more enlightened people of Europe -- especially France and Germany -- are correct in wanting to contain Saddam, rather than follow Resolution 1441 (which they supported) and disarming him. The reasoning for the disconnect between the U.S. and "old Europe" is that the media over here is blindly following the Bush administration line. For many in America, (myself included) we see the opposition as mere blatant anti-Americanism.

A new poll in France demonstrates the latter is true.


French public opinion has hardened against going to war on Iraq, according to a poll out on Monday.

By far the most common reason given for opposing the use of force was hostility to the United States' role in the crisis. A U.N.-mandated intervention would win majority support, however.

...

Offered a choice of three reasons to best explain why they opposed going to war, 76 percent of the anti-war camp said they "dislike they way the United States is behaving in the crisis".

Just nine percent said the were mainly against military action because Iraqi President Saddam Hussein was not a threat to international security and 13 percent chose to explain their view by saying the crisis did not affect France's interests.


So, there's your answer.

Another amusing note in the report just shows you how different politics are on the other side of the pond.


Opposition to war was rather stronger among left-wingers than among conservative supporters of President Jacques Chirac, 79 percent of whom favoured France supporting, with troops or at least indirect help, any eventual U.N.-backed military action.


Chirac conservative? Only in Europe.

1:00 PM

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