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Matthew Hoy currently works as a metro page designer at the San Diego Union-Tribune.

The opinions presented here do not represent those of the Union-Tribune and are solely those of the author.

If you have any opinions or comments, please e-mail the author at: hoystory -at- cox -dot- net.

Dec. 7, 2001
Christian Coalition Challenged
Hoystory interviews al Qaeda
Fisking Fritz
Politicizing Prescription Drugs

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Wednesday, August 14, 2002
U.S. legal system, part two: Omer Salmain Saleh Bakarbashat, a Yemeni national in the U.S. illegally and scooped up in the post-Sept. 11 sweep of illegal aliens has pleaded guilty to immigration violations and awaits deportation. The San Diego Union-Tribune has an excellent article on Bakarbashat in which he makes the following observations of the U.S. justice system


Though he wants to remain in the United States and still believes the judicial system here is better than other countries, he is disillusioned.

"America is considered to be a first-world country that treats everyone good, with justice for everyone, human rights for everyone. The way I see it sometimes I doubt that. It's not justice for everyone, it depends who you are and where you're coming from.

"Even what I've been through, I still believe in this country," he said. "There is more justice here than back home. There is no perfect system, but it is better than the others."


After reading the story, I bear no ill will to Bakarbashat. I don't think he had advance knowledge of the Sept. 11 attacks, but the situation he's in is of his own creation -- he overstayed his visa.

I'm sympathetic to people who come to the United States in hopes of a better life -- no matter what their country of origin. Unfortunately, we can't let everyone into the United States who would like to come. Instead, we must focus on using our money and influence to foster democracy and capitalism in these countries, so people like Bakarbashat can pursue their dreams in their homeland.

11:06 PM

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