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Matthew Hoy currently works as a metro page designer at the San Diego Union-Tribune.

The opinions presented here do not represent those of the Union-Tribune and are solely those of the author.

If you have any opinions or comments, please e-mail the author at: hoystory -at- cox -dot- net.

Dec. 7, 2001
Christian Coalition Challenged
Hoystory interviews al Qaeda
Fisking Fritz
Politicizing Prescription Drugs

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Wednesday, December 26, 2001
If the Wall Street Journal's analysis is accurate, then it looks like the American traitor John Walker Lindh is in some deep water.


Nor is it any protection to have committed the treason abroad, a point established in the case of Tomoya Kawakita, a young Japanese-American who on the eve of war went to Japan to visit and was prevented by the outbreak of war from returning. During the war, the court noted, he reached his majority in Japan, changed his registration from American to Japanese, showed sympathy with Japan and hostility to the United States, served as a civilian employee of a private corporation producing war materials for Japan, and brutally abused American prisoners of war who were forced to work there. He was brought up on the treason charge when he returned to America on an American passport. In sustaining his conviction, the Supreme Court established that an American citizen owes allegiance to America wherever he may reside.


I'm anxious to see the trial of the traitor begin. I would hope that it can be done quickly and without the media circus that accompanied the OJ trial. If he is put before a military tribunal, which is unlikely, the trial would not be televised. More likely is a trial before a federal judge in Virginia (federal prosecutors could've brought the trial in the district where Walker last lived, but then we'd have to slap them for suggesting San Francisco). Television cameras are banned in federal courts, but CourtTV is filing a lawsuit asserting that the ban is unconstitutional.

My money is on the trial not being televised.

11:35 PM

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