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Matthew Hoy currently works as a metro page designer at the San Diego Union-Tribune.

The opinions presented here do not represent those of the Union-Tribune and are solely those of the author.

If you have any opinions or comments, please e-mail the author at: hoystory -at- cox -dot- net.

Dec. 7, 2001
Christian Coalition Challenged
Hoystory interviews al Qaeda
Fisking Fritz
Politicizing Prescription Drugs

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Saturday, March 19, 2005
Housing prices: San Diego County continues to be one of the most expensive housing markets in the country. Only 11 percent of San Diego County households are able to a afford a median-priced home.

So, what does the staff of San Diego's Park and Recreation department propose in response to this? A 939 percent increase in the city park impact fee. The average fee for each new home or condo built in San Diego would rise from $2,637 to $24,755 under the proposal -- which was rightly rejected by the city's advisory board.

It's just plain scary that city staff would be so divorced from the reality that most San Diego residents -- not homeowners -- face. The average new home in San Diego County sold for $435,000 last month -- that includes condos and condo conversions in far-flung communities that bring down the average. The number for San Diego itself is higher.

But the Park and Recreation Department apparently doesn't read the newspaper.


In the report, April Penera said no waiver should be granted for the proposed increase in areas targeted for affordable housing. The report acknowledged that a higher fee could reduce the number of homes in San Diego and lead to a "perceived increase in the cost of affordable housing." But Penera told the board yesterday that the higher fee also would ensure neighborhood revitalization around community parks, swimming pools and recreation centers.

"I couldn't imagine a cooler way to have your community bond," she said.


You can't afford to buy a home, but there's a nice pool you can use while you pay inflated rental prices.

12:02 PM

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