WALL STREET JOURNAL
NATIONAL REVIEW ONLINE
THE WEEKLY STANDARD
DRUDGE REPORT
THE WASHINGTON POST
SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE
NEW YORK TIMES


*=recently updated





Matthew Hoy currently works as a metro page designer at the San Diego Union-Tribune.

The opinions presented here do not represent those of the Union-Tribune and are solely those of the author.

If you have any opinions or comments, please e-mail the author at: hoystory -at- cox -dot- net.

Dec. 7, 2001
Christian Coalition Challenged
Hoystory interviews al Qaeda
Fisking Fritz
Politicizing Prescription Drugs

RSS FEED
<< current


Amazon Honor System Click Here to Pay Learn More













A note on the Amazon ads: I've chosen to display current events titles in the Amazon box. Unfortunately, Amazon appears to promote a disproportionate number of angry-left books. I have no power over it at this time. Rest assured, I'm still a conservative.



Thursday, December 23, 2004
Mainstream media still doesn't get it: The Hartford Courant went out and asked a bunch of elite media bigwigs what the biggest "media story" of the year was and published their answers.

My vote would be for CBS News' forged documents and the trailblazing work in exposing it by Little Green Footballs and Powerline.

However, I'm not a bigwig and therefore totally off when it comes to the "big media" story.

Only NPR's ombudsman Jeffrey Dvorkin even mentions CBS -- but not Dan Rather -- and only in passing.


"Sloppy journalism at CBS, the New York Times and the BBC have also contributed. The slow but steady increase of ombudsmen at media organizations also indicates that many media organizations know that something has gone wrong in their world."


That's it. That's the most that anyone has to say about a major network news organization attempting to influence the outcome of a presidential election by peddling obviously forged (but true!) documents.

So, what does the media's elite think the big stories are?

The media being "spun" by campaigns.

The uselessness of objectivity.

Rupert Murdoch buying DirecTV.

The media's failure to expose the Iraq War as a really bad thing.

The beginning of the end of print media. [They've been decrying that for decades.]

These are all second tier stories at best (the Murdoch one is third tier).

The media's got a big problem, and they haven't even taken the first step towards fixing it, by admitting it.

1:38 PM

Comments: Post a Comment

Powered by Blogger Pro™